Leveraging Bank and Credit Union Leadership Team Strengths with Working Genius

Shawn Temple
Leveraging Bank and Credit Union Leadership Team Strengths with Working Genius

Community bank and credit union leadership teams are incredibly diverse. Your leaders have a wide range of skillsets, interests and opinions. Certain executives might even seem like oil and water with each other – so far apart in leadership styles that it hurts the group.

But those "oil and water" differences aren’t always a bad thing.

In fact, they are strengths you must learn to leverage effectively. Patrick Lencioni’s Working Genius model teaches six types of "geniuses" make up the workflow. Each one is necessary for successfully meeting your goals.

As Pegeen Singley, SVP of Administration at Centric FCU, says:

"On the senior management team, we had a little bit of each. We had geniuses in all the areas. So, it told us why we had been successful for so many years together."

How do you leverage your varied strengths? Let’s take a look.

1. Know Your Strengths

This point is simple but important. Your community bank or credit union leadership team will never use its strengths well if you have no clue what they are. Start with a Working Genius Assessment.

The assessment is short, but it reveals a boatload of information about how you work. You learn about your geniuses, competencies and frustrations with some short explanations. For more in-depth understanding of the results, a Working Genius session is necessary.

But whether you just take the assessment or undergo an in-depth session, assessments give you a good gauge of each leader’s individual strengths.

2. Have a Meeting of Minds

Do you know everyone’s geniuses now? Work them into your community bank or credit union leadership team meetings. Each person can own their genius area.

Ask the leader who loves invention what new ideas they have. Ask your discerning leader about problems with the idea. Ask your tenacious leader if it’s feasible to push a project over the finish line.

These genius areas shouldn’t restrict other people from jumping in, but they do ensure the "experts" get to speak.

Hopefully your new understanding of each leader’s strengths reduces judgment and encourages open dialogue as well. Geniuses shouldn’t be points of contention; they should be areas of complement. As Pegeen said earlier, a well-rounded leadership team can cover all the bases.

3. Pick Up the Slack

Knowing the frustrations of people on your community bank or credit union leadership team is as important as knowing their geniuses. It gives you advance notice of where another team member needs your help.

If someone strong in wondering (thinking about opportunities or problems) is put into their frustration area of galvanizing (stirring up others for a project)…you know to provide support.

Once again, you complement each other.

You complete the circle and drive each other to success by leaning on each leader’s geniuses and being leaned on for their frustrations. And again, this isn’t about judgment or guilt. It should reduce those emotions on your team as you accept and help each other.

Are you ready to transform your community bank or credit union leadership team? Book a free consultation for a Working Genius session today.

Shawn Temple
Strategy Director
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