Want Younger Members? Try Sticker Marketing.

Sean Galli

You want to get younger. Understandable. After all, what credit union in America doesn’t want to reach used car shoppers and first-time home buyers? But does it seem like nothing you do actually penetrates the newer generations?

Enter sticker marketing.

You see stickers everywhere. Political stickers on our cars. Book jacket stickers advertising new movies. Not to mention how the younger demographic decorates their Macs and HydroFlasks with stickers like crazy.

Dozens of well-known brands like these are making engaging stickers a fixture of their marketing efforts. Outdoor apparel shop Patagonia mails customers free stickers. Fast food chain In-N-Out distributes stickers to diners. And Coca-Cola sends stickers to soda lovers.

But why does sticker marketing resonate with the younger demographic? And why should your credit union consider it?

Stickers Impart Ownership

Sticker marketing strikes a chord with younger audiences because it makes them your brand participants.

Millennial Marketing shows 80% of millennials want entertaining brands, 40% want to co-create brands and 46% make original content.

This data reveals millennials desire personal brand engagement. They want to laugh with you, dream with you and be your brand ambassadors.

Clever, unique sticker designs entertain younger audiences. Plus, stickers customizing personal items let younger members “co-create” with you.

Stickers As Self-Expression

A November 2021 Nielsen report stated, “88% of global respondents trust recommendations from people they know more than any other channel.” The report also shows 55% of North Americans ignore online banner ads.

How does Nielsen’s word-of-mouth endorsement affect your sticker marketing?

Sticker marketing offers a younger demographic self-expression avenues. And then, self-expression presents word of mouth advertisement opportunities.

Putting a sticker on your laptop expresses your personality. It also makes you a walking endorsement. Your friends look at your laptop. They ask you about the sticker. You express your passion.

The word of mouth potential your sticker marketing carries transforms young members into brand disciples.

The “I Voted” Effect

The “I Voted” stickers are iconic. Color scheme and logo are simple. Message is short but effective. And your identity is abundantly clear.

You voted. You are a voter.

It's a visible indicator you performed your civic duty. And visible pressure if you haven’t yet voted.

Studies show lying about not voting has a high cost. During the 2010 and 2012 elections, researchers offered participants cash to incentivize lying about their voting record. Surprisingly, the experiment’s findings displayed lying had a $7 price tag. It's much less costly to vote and tell the truth.

The “I Voted” sticker represents membership in a special club. You feel significant pressure to join the club if you haven’t already.

Help Them Join the Club

Younger demographics want to belong. They want to join your club. So, give them a reason to join.

Craft a message expressing the benefits your credit union offers. Like the “I Voted” sticker, make your sticker marketing simple, clear and repeatable.

What are the non-members missing if they don’t join?

Imagine a non-member seeing a sticker saying “I Saved” or “Easy Money.” If not a member (the message implies), you miss savings and lose money. Sticker viewers become future brand disciples.

Make your stickers badges of honor.

Where does your sticker marketing go from here? Contact On The Mark Strategies, and our creative team will help you craft attractive sticker designs for younger audiences.

Sean Galli
Copywriter
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